?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Shimmer Magazine [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Shimmer Magazine

[ website | Shimmer ]
[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

Issue Nine: Spring 2008 [Aug. 7th, 2008|06:18 pm]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

[Yay! An issue!]
Spring 2008 Cover

Read the rest of this entry »

link8 comments|post comment

Issue Nine: Spring 2008 [Aug. 7th, 2008|06:18 pm]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

[Yay! An issue!]

Spring 2008 Cover

Read the rest of this entry »

link5 comments|post comment

test [Jul. 23rd, 2008|11:04 am]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

testtest

link1 comment|post comment

Temporarily closed to submissions [Jul. 7th, 2008|11:40 am]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

We’re temporarily closed to submissions; please do not submit work to us until further notice.

Clockwork Jungle submissions: All Clockwork Jungle submissions not yet responded to are still under consideration. Thank you for your extended patience as we work toward our final decisions.

All other submissions will be returned to their authors, with our thanks and our regrets.

link1 comment|post comment

Issue Eight: The Art Issue (Winter 2008) [Jul. 3rd, 2008|10:11 pm]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

art08 Now Available!
For this issue, the art comes first. We selected art, and then invited some Shimmery favorites to write stories inspired by the images. Our cover image is Penny’s Grave, by award-winning artist John Picacio; we used it as the trigger for a contest at the Liberty Hall Writer’s Workshop. The winning story is Penny Wise, by Kurt Kirchmeier.

Sandro Castelli’s Cherub inspired Michael Livingston’s A Very Young Boy With Largely Clipped Wings.

Conceptions of the Mind, by Fatima Azimova, was the trigger for Aliette de Bodard’s Within the City of the Swan.

Chrissy Ellsworth’s My Career as a Fashion Designer inspired Dresses, Three, by Angela Slatter.

And Carrie Ann Baade’s Untitled (Hawk headed infant with frogs) gave us Flying and Falling, by Kuzhali Manickavel.

These art-inspired stories are joined by new stories from Daniel Rabuzzi and Josh Vogt.

View the full table of contents, or order your copy today!

Read the rest of this entry »

link1 comment|post comment

Interview with Gerald Costlow Winter 2006 [Jun. 26th, 2008|11:22 pm]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

Gerald Costlow’s story, The Persian Box, appears in the Winter 2006 issue of Shimmer

Questions about the story:

Where did the idea for The Persian Box come from?
I have a soft spot for stories told in a tavern or bar and wanted to try my hand at it. Beyond that, I had a fuzzy idea about a man with a cursed box, and the muse took over as I wrote.

Do you work with a critique or writers group?
I used to participate in the Critters online writing group, although it’s been perhaps a year since I dropped out of the queue. The critiques were definitely useful. No particular reason for not participating right now other than I’ve been putting more energy into novels, and I highly recommend some sort of critique group for any beginning writer.

How did the story change as you developed it?
The first draft of this story was written in standard third person POV, and while it received good critiques, I was never satisfied with it. I wanted to quickly draw the reader into the story. After tinkering with it for over a year, I decided to make the reader a character in the story. I liked the result and started sending it out. You might say this is an experiment that turned out better than expected.

Do you have any any interesting anecdotes about the creation of The Persian Box?
Every critique led to speculations on just what POV the story has. I started off calling it First Person Monolog, but many readers insisted it was Second Person Passive or some such hybrid.

Questions about writing:

Who do you write for? Yourself or someone else?
That’s like asking any actor or singer if they perform for themselves or someone else. I’m a storyteller in search of an audience. Sure, it’s an art form and some writers have inspired people to both noble and terrible deeds. But when you get down to basics, we’re in Show Business. The page we write on is our stage. If at the end of my act, I’ve taken you away from the mundane and into a world of make-believe, then I’ve completed my part of the deal. Applause appreciated, but I’d rather you throw money.

How long had you been submitting before you made your first sale?
About five years, although there were sporadic attempts before that to get published.

How did you celebrate your first sale?
I cashed the check and blew the wad on a trip to McDonalds.

What writing projects are you presently working on?
I have several novels in different stages of completion. I should be doing yet another edit of a novella where I’m trying to figure out whether to cut or expand on for market purposes.

Does popular culture/entertainment influence your writing?
Only to the extent that I find it impossible not to critique the plot of any movie and that’s good practice for my own writing.

What time of day do you prefer to do your writing?
New chapters are done in the early morning. I wake about 4 AM and have several hours of quiet, uninterrupted writing time on the computer. Then I spend time during the day thinking about what I’ve written and do editing in the evening. I’m not a very fast writer.

Favorite short story read this year?
I discovered the Lucifer series of comic books by DC Vertigo. It’s based on characters created by Neil Gaiman, but this writer is Mike Carey. Some issues are pure magic. I urge you to buy issue #33. It will haunt you.

Favorite book read when you were a child?
I loved Doctor Seuss. I grew up in a little town that didn’t have a library, but I’d check his books out over and over again from the bookmobile that stopped in our neighborhood once a week.

link2 comments|post comment

Interview with Jay Lake Winter 2006 [Jun. 26th, 2008|11:10 pm]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

Jay Lake’s story, The Black Back-Lands, appears in the Winter 2006 issue of Shimmer

Questions about the story:

Where did the idea for The Black Back-Lands come from?
The writers’ group I work with, Wordos in Eugene, Oregon, has holiday readings every year for Halloween and Christmas. I wrote this story for Halloween, naturally. The title comes from a book of classic Irish fairy stories I was reading to my daughter at the time — in that English translation, ca. 1890 I think, what we might think of as “Elfland” or “Under the Hill” was called “the Black Back-Lands”. That must be a literal translation of an Irish Gaelic term, as I’ve never heard it before, but it’s evocative. I wrote to the title, basically, transposing the idea of “Under the Hill” into a post-apocalyptic setting. The pathway on which the story takes place would be on the east face of Rocky Butte, in the very eastern end of Portland.

Do you work with a critique or writers group?
Wordos, in Eugene, Oregon. I’ve been there since December of 2000.

How did the story change as you developed it?
It didn’t, actually. I wrote it to be read aloud, in one quick sitting (it is flash), and except for some minor line editing, it remains as it emerged from my fingertips.

Do you have any cut scenes/outtakes/etc that might be entertaining/informative? Any interesting anecdotes?
I don’t really have any cuts to share, since the story emerged pretty much organically from my keyboard. This is quite typical for me, by the way, especially with shorter work. I will comment that having carried water camping a time or two I was somewhat consumed with the idea of how much those buckets would weigh. That east face of Rocky Butte is mighty steep. Believe it or not, I spent time thinking about the economics and defense practices of clifftop village in hostile terrain.

Questions about writing:

Who do you write for? Yourself or someone else?
I write for the story. That may sound pretentious, or even goofy, but it’s true. I don’t owe the audience anything, I owe the story everthing. Once I have released it into the wild, the story speaks for itself to the audience.

How long had you been submitting before you made your first sale?
Eleven years.

How did you celebrate your first sale?
I geeked out badly.

What writing projects are you presently working on?
I have a novel under contract to Night Shade Books which I need to finish soon. (Ahem.) It’s called Trial of Flowers and is a follow-on of sorts to my short story The Soul Bottles which appeared in Leviathan 4, ed. Forrest Aguirre. I’ve got another novel in progress called Original Destiny, Manifest Sin, a sort of magical alternate history of the Old West. I have to do some road-tripping this summer to Montana to do field research on the locations in that book.

Does popular culture/entertaiment influence your writing?
Not too much. I haven’t watched broadcast or cable TV since about 1994, and I get to the movies maybe five or six times a year. I don’t own a videogame system. I do pay a lot of attention to the news, via NPR, several dead tree magazines, and a number of Web sites, and I read a lot of fiction. So obviously those things filter in to me.

What time of day do you prefer to do your writing?
Any time works, but for reasons of my personal schedule early evening seems to be the most typical by far.

Favorite short story read this year?
It’s January 10th. What can I say?

Favorite book read when you were a child?
Lord of the Rings, of course.

Random Questions:

If you could trade places with anyone, who would it be? And Why?
Are you nuts? I’m having the time of my life. Now, I wouldn’t mind trading bank balances with a few people…

Do you believe in ghosts or the supernatural?
Do I believe? No. I am a dyed-in-the-wool empiricist. I would love to see evidence, or have a meaningful supernatural experience of my very own. I’ve had a couple of marginal supernatural experiences, but not enough to convince me. This of course in no way affects my ability to shamelessly exploit the noumenal world in my fiction.

If you have a day job, what is it?
I’m a marketing director for a Midwestern telecommunications company. Really. They all think I’m a total weirdo, but I do good work, so everybody’s happy.

Fast food: Yea or Nay?
Yeah baby. Junk food junkie.

Favourite food?
Pizza.

Favourite restaurant?
Nice restaurant: Castle Hill Cafe, Austin, TX
Pizza: Flying Pie, Portland, Oregon
BBQ (my other favorite): The Salt Lick, Driftwood, TX

Name one place in your hometown that you love to go to and would recommend to others to visit.
I don’t really have a hometown — born and raised overseas — but Forest Park in Portland, where I live now, is deeply awesome. Hundreds of acres of deep Northwest forests dark enough to put frost on your soul, right in the middle of town.

What are some of your hobbies?
Writing, writing, and, uh, writing.

Cat or dog person? (or something else, like birds, iguanas, or even evil robot monkeys?)
Cats. Dogs are ok, but not my thing. Cats are worthless parasites of course. Just ask mine.

Is there anything that you would “sell your soul” for?
More time in my life to write, both every day and on a lifetime basis.

All-time favourite movie?
Bladerunner.

If you had a working time machine what advice would you give a younger self?
Write more. Get serious sooner. (I made my first sale at 37.) And don’t eat that cheese whopper in the summer of 1986, cause that trip to the E.R. for food poisoning really sucked.

Do you have a secret skill that you never get to show off? (i.e. ambidextrous writing, blood-curdling screams, double-jointed, badmitton champion…)
Only with very close friends.

How many writers does it take to change a lightbulb?
None. We’re always working in the dark.

linkpost comment

Interview with Samantha Henderson [Jun. 26th, 2008|10:54 pm]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

Samantha Henderson’s story, Route Nine, appears in the Winter 2006 issue of Shimmer.

Questions about Route Nine

Where did the idea for Route Nine come from?
For various reasons I’ve found myself driving up and down California’s Central Valley many times. Route Nine is my collective impression of many small towns along that route, taken a step further.

Do you work with a critique or writers group?
I work with a ten-member online critique group.

How did the story change as you developed it?
It became decidedly weirder.

Questions about writing:

Who do you write for? Yourself or someone else?
I write for myself and hope that others will like it.

How long had you been submitting before you made your first sale?
Hmmm. I had a period of writing and submitting in my twenties, with a few sales to small markets and many rejection slips, and I really don’t remember the timelines. Then I took time out for kids and career. I started writing and submitting again seriously about three years ago, and almost immediately made a sale to Strange Horizons, which surprises me a lot more now than it did then. So you could say about 15 years or two months, depending on how you define it.

How did you celebrate your first sale?
That is between my husband and myself. (grins)

What writing projects are you presently working on?
I’m working on two young adult novels — one is a collaboration, and on the other I am the sole author.

Does popular culture or entertaiment influence your writing?
I’m sure it must.

What time of day do you prefer to do your writing?
Ideally, early afternoon. But I have to grab time as I can get it.

Favorite short story read this year?
Neil Gaiman’s A Study in Emerald from the Shadows Over Baker Street anthology.

Favorite book read when you were a child?
Susan Cooper’s The Dark is Rising

Random Questions

If you could trade places with anyone, who would it be? And Why?
Oh no. That’s like wishing for a million dollars and losing your child and getting a million dollar cashout on an insurance policy. I’m not qualified to play that game.

Do you believe in ghosts or the supernatural?
No — which leaves me conflicted, because my house is haunted.

What’s your day job?
I am a church secretary. No, really.

Fast food: Yea or Nay?
In moderation? Good Lord, yes.

Favourite food?
At the moment, I have to say sushi.

Favourite restaurant?
The Blue Nile, an Ethiopian restaurant in Berkeley, California. No idea if it’s still there.

What are some of your hobbies?
Horseback riding. Used to be embroidery, but my fingers have gotten rough and clumsy lately. Does reading count?

Cat or dog person? (or something else, like birds, iguanas, or even evil robot monkeys?)
I am hideously allergic to cats, so by default a dog person. All my current dogs are from Corgi rescue. I’m very fond of snakes, but I can’t keep them anymore because overnight, it seemed, I went from being indifferent to the plight of various feeder rodents to really being squicked at the sight of their little paws going down the gullet.

Is there anything that you would “sell your soul” for?
Nah. See the “trading places” answer above.

All-time favourite movie?
Favorite in terms of craft? The Third Man. Favorite in terms of gosh-wow fun? Raiders of the Lost Ark, which was recently given a run for its money by National Treasure.

If you had a working time machine what advice would you give a younger self?
Damn. Buy Amazon.com at $1 and sell at $100.

Do you have a secret skill that you never get to show off? (i.e. ambidextrous writing, blood-curdling screams, double-jointed, badmitton champion…)
I can toss various food items into the air and catch them in my mouth.

Quiz: How many writers does it take to change a lightbulb?
Depends on whether it’s an interstitial, slipstream, new weird or dark fantasy light bulb.

linkpost comment

About Us [Jun. 26th, 2008|09:37 pm]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

Shimmer publishes short fiction several times a year, in both print and electronic versions. Shimmery stories are most often contemporary fantasy, frequently dark or darkly funny, and always gorgeous.

Who are we? Check out our Shimmery People page for information about the staff.

Contact Information

Questions and Comments

Send an e-mail to: info@shimmerzine.com

Submissions

Send an e-mail to: submissions@shimmerzine.com

Mailing Address

PO Box 58591
Salt Lake City, UT 84158-0591

PayPal Address

sales@shimmerzine.com

link1 comment|post comment

Guidelines [Jun. 26th, 2008|09:10 pm]
Shimmer Magazine

maryrobinette
[Tags|]

Originally published at Shimmer. You can comment here or there.

Submission Guidelines

What to send us: Unusual and beautifully-written speculative fiction stories with full plots and strong characters. The best way to understand what we are looking for is to read an issue of the magazine. We also recommend reading our What We Want page for more information. We do not accept poetry or reprints (including stories you’ve published on your blog or other internet sites).

Length: We like our fiction short - under 5000 words. If your story is longer than 5000 words (and yes, 5100 words is longer than 5000 words) but you believe we would love it, please send us a query briefly describing the story, and send us the first page of the story. If we like what we see, we’ll ask to read the rest. (Bear in mind that we are extraordinarily unlikely to publish a story over 7,500 words. We just don’t have the space.)

Payment and Rights: We pay 1 cent per word, minimum $10. You’ll also receive two copies of the issue in which your story appears. Additional contributor copies available at the subscription rate. We purchase First Serial rights and electronic rights. 120 days after publication, most rights revert to the author, but we retain the right to continue selling back issues of the magazine, the right to archive your story, and non-exclusive anthology rights.

How to submit: Send your manuscript as an attachment (.doc or .rtf) in standard manuscript format to submissions@shimmerzine.com. Make sure the subject line begins with Submission and has the title of your story. Example: “Submission: Attack of the Evil Robot Monkeys.”

Response Time: We are usually able to reply to submissions within three weeks. If it has been longer than one month, feel free to query us at the submission e-mail. We comment on most submissions.

Simultaneous submissions: We do accept simultaneous submissions, but you must tell us this when you submit your story. If we accept your piece, please withdraw it immediately from other markets; if it’s accepted somewhere else, please let us know immediately. We do not accept multiple submissions: one story at a time, please.

Other: We occasionally run non-fiction, audio pieces, cartoons, and other miscellanea; if you have something other than fiction that you think might tempt us, please query to the submissions e-mail.

Art: Read our art guidelines for more information.

Questions: Still have questions? Send an e-mail to: info@shimmerzine.com

link1 comment|post comment

navigation
[ viewing | most recent entries ]
[ go | earlier ]